New chief settling into role in Greenhills

When patient expectations battle with reality

JCOFig

/ Jennie Key/The Community Press Filed Under GREENHILLS Police Chief Neil Ferdelman has been successful at everything hes tried in his 37-year police career. Except retirement. He retired in March 2012 as chief of the Hamilton (Ohio) Police Department, and then went right back to work to help with some administrative work. He was hired last month to be chief in Greenhills; his first day was June 24. Police work wasnt his original career objective. He intended to be a lawyer, and headed off to the University of Cincinnati after graduating from Garfield High School.
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The authors just chose to do it that way. Depressingly as well, the authors conclusion about radiation therapy is very similar to their conclusion about chemotherapy, except that slightly different factors appear to be correlated with an inaccurate understanding of the palliative nature of the proposed treatment: The proportion of patients who did not accurately understand that palliative RT was not at all likely to cure their cancer was 64%. Table 2 shows the unadjusted and adjusted analyses of factors associated with inaccurate beliefs about cure from RT. On multivariable analysis, older patients were more likely to have inaccurate beliefs (with age younger than 55 years as the reference, odds ratio [OR] was 1.44 for ages 55 to 64 years, 1.78 for ages 65 to 74 years, and 2.45 for ages older than 74 years; overall P =.02) as were patients of nonwhite race (African American OR, 1.48; other nonwhites OR, 3.32; overall P =.009), and patients whose surveys were completed by surrogates because they were too sick were less likely to have inaccurate beliefs (OR, 0.54; P = .04). Likelihood of inaccurate beliefs also varied by PDCR site (overall P .04). Then, combining the results about radiation therapy with the results concerning chemotherapy previously reported in the NEJM, the authors report this not-so-surprising result: Among 285 patients in our cohort who also completed survey items on their expectations about chemotherapy, we found that patients with inaccurate beliefs about RT were significantly more likely to also have inaccurate beliefs about chemotherapy (P.
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